| images by john ecker, pantheon photography

Posts tagged “architecture

The Eastern Road, Nassau, Gazebo, photo by John Ecker | pantheon photography

The Eastern Road, Nassau, Gazebo 1,  photo by John Ecker pantheon photographyTHE EASTERN ROAD, NASSAU, GAZEBO:  This enhanced image was shot along the most picturesque section of public beach along the Eastern Road. The gazebo is quite derelect now but still makes for an evocative image.

Shot with a Nikon D3100, 10-24 DX  lens at 13mm, ISO 800, 1/200 sec., f25. Copyright photo by John Ecker   |    pantheon photography

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Ceiling over Nave, Amiens Cathedral, France, photo by John Ecker | pantheon photography

Amiens Cathedral Ceiling 1 lr

CEILING OVER NAVE, AMIENS CATHEDRAL, FRANCE:  Amiens’ Cathedral of Notre Dame sits atop a gently rising hill above the peaceful River Somme in northern France.  While the actual date of completion is somewhat disputed, most historians agree the church was completed around 1270.  It took approximately 50 years to build— in an era of no motors, cranes nor any electrical or gas powered tools.  It was built with brains, brawn and stone using clever hoists, ramps, levers and fulcrums. Amazing, really. Although Amiens is not the tallest Gothic cathedral in France (that’s Beauvais, although it remains incomplete), it is the largest. The nave ceiling rises 139 feet above the floor, roughly the same height as a modern fourteen storey building.

In the First World War, the town of Amiens sustained heavy damage during the “Kaiser’s Battle,” the last major offensive of the German Army.  The battle raged within miles of the cathedral. It sustained some heavy bombardment and several chapels were damaged. The main structure remained sound.  I like this photo for its geometric patterns and the various gradients of pink and yellow colour cast by the sunlight beaming in through the upper windows.

Shot handheld and braced with a Nikon D300, 16-85 DX zoom lens at 16mm, ISO 3200, 1/80 sec., f11. Copyright photo by John Ecker   |    pantheon photography


Bressanone (Brixen) Cathedral, Italy, photo by John Ecker | pantheon photography

Bressanone  Cathedral Cloisters, Italy, photo by John Ecker, Pantheon PhotographyCLOISTERS, BRESSANONE (BRIXEN) CATHEDRAL OF THE ASSUMPTION, ITALY: The word ‘cloisters’ is derived from the Latin ‘claustrum’ or enclosure. It’s an open space surrounded by covered walks, usually in the form of a square. It is open space in a monastery or nunnery that still affords much privacy.  If you’ve ever heard or used the word ‘cloistered’—meaning a sheltered existence—that’s where it originates. This cloisters is attached to the Cathedral of the Assumption. It was were built around 1200 A.D. in the Romanesque period. There are many beautiful frescoes on the vaulted ceiling, mostly from the 14th to 16th centuries, many of which have been restored. While the town is officially Bressanone, it is also popularly known by its Austrian name, Brixen. More that 70 per cent of the peole there speak German. Shot with Nikon D3100 with 10-24 Nikkor lens at 12mm at 1600 ISO, 1/25 sec, f/6.3, photo by John Ecker  |  pantheon photography


Hidden Confessions, Chicago, photo by John Ecker | pantheon photography

HIDDEN CONFESSIONS, CHICAGO: Chicago is one of my favourite cities.  I love to wander around and mostly shoot the beautiful architecture.  People watching is also fun and I grabbed this shot on my way back from Marina City, just up river from the plaza where the photo was taken.  Shot handheld with a Nikon D3100 with a Nikkor 18-200mm lens at 120mm, f14, 1/60 sec., ISO 800.   Photo by John Ecker     |     pantheon photography


House of Blues and Marina Towers, Chicago, U.S.A., photo by John Ecker | pantheon photography


MARINA TOWERS AND HOUSE OF BLUES, CHICAGO:  I love walking around Chicago with my camera.  Beautiful and iconic architecture abounds.  One of… or should I say two of… my favourite buildings are the Marina Towers at Marina City.  They are affectionately known as the “corncobs”. The buildings sit on a platform that also holds a concert hall… Chicago’s famous House of Blues.  Beneath the assembly of buildings is a pleasure craft marina, right on the river.  The $36M buildings were opened in 1964. In addition to the residential towers and music hall,  when opened, the site included shopping, a theatre, bowling, gym, ice rink and other amenities.  The first 19 floors of each tower is for parking for almost 900 cars.  The 20th floor houses the laundry facilities.  Floors 21 to 60 house 450 apartment units, converted to condominiums in 1977.  Real estate listings in January 2013 included 2 bedroom units for $465,000 and larger one bedroom units for $300,000.

Shot handheld with a Nikon D3100 with a Nikkor 18-200mm lens at 125mm, f5, 1/125 sec., ISO 400.   Photo by John Ecker     |     pantheon photography


Old and New, Tall Buildings, Chicago, U.S.A., photo by John Ecker | pantheon photography

OLD AND NEW TALL BUILDINGS, CHICAGO:  Chicago is one of my favourite American cities.  I particularly like the careful mix of old and newer architecture and the pride Chicagoans have in their built heritage.  There is lots of information on-line that is worth checking out to learn more about the architectural beauty of America’s “Second City.”  Chicago Architecture Foundation is a great site and has excellent information about architectural tours.  Chicago Architecture Info  is another great source of information about Chicago buildings.  A View on Cities is a website that features very good basic information about architecture in the great cities of the world. The site contains lots of information about Chicago’s buildings, including photos, year of construction, height, etc.  Good for identifying buildings.

Shot handheld with a Nikon D3100 with a Nikkor 18-200mm lens at 130mm, f5.6, 1/1250 sec., ISO 800.   Photo by John Ecker     |     pantheon photography


Exterior, John F. Kennedy Library, Boston, Massachusetts

EXTERIOR: JOHN F. KENNEDY LIBRARY, BOSTON MASSACHUSETTS: I love this building by I.M. Pei. See my shot of the gigantic American Flag this other photo of the Kennedy Library.  The building sits on a 9.5 acre parcel of land on Columbia Point, facing across Dorchester Bay. To the east is Boston Harbour and then the open sea. The Library was built on a landfill site. To prepare the site for construction, it was raised 15 feet and beach grasses were planted in tribute to Kennedy’s love of the sea. The building itself is a triangular 10-storey tower. There is a two storey base that houses the library’s excellent exhibition space. In 1991 a 21,000 square foot waterfront addition was constructed to host more of the library’s educational and cultural programs.

Shot handheld with a Nikon D300, Nikkor AF-S 16-85 lens at 26mm, 1/1250 sec., f18, ISO 1600.

Photo by John Ecker | Pantheon


John F. Kennedy Library, Boston, Massachusetts

JOHN F. KENNEDY LIBRARY, BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS: Plans for the library began even before Kennedy’s untimely death.  The tradition of privately paid-for presidential libraries began with the Roosevelt library.  In 1961, the Kennedy administration approached Harvard University, seeking space next to its library for an eventual Kennedy library.  Not long after his death, the family stated its preference that the library be the only large monument to the President.  Money was raised, plans were developed and…. stagnation.  After years of challenges dealing with the site— including Cambridge residents concerned about the influx of tourists, the Harvard site was abandoned in 1975.  Columbia Point, on the grounds of the University of Massachusetts was then selected.  Jackie Kennedy personally chose architect I.M. Pei to build the magnificent structure.  What an inspired choice. The Kennedy Library opened in October 1979, more than 15 years after Kennedy’s assassination.  Photo Shot handheld with a Nikon D300, Nikkor 16-85 AF-S, at 30mm, f10, 1/400 sec, 1600 ISO,

Photo by John Ecker    |    Pantheon Photography