| images by john ecker, pantheon photography

Posts tagged “Ecker

House of Blues and Marina Towers, Chicago, U.S.A., photo by John Ecker | pantheon photography


MARINA TOWERS AND HOUSE OF BLUES, CHICAGO:  I love walking around Chicago with my camera.  Beautiful and iconic architecture abounds.  One of… or should I say two of… my favourite buildings are the Marina Towers at Marina City.  They are affectionately known as the “corncobs”. The buildings sit on a platform that also holds a concert hall… Chicago’s famous House of Blues.  Beneath the assembly of buildings is a pleasure craft marina, right on the river.  The $36M buildings were opened in 1964. In addition to the residential towers and music hall,  when opened, the site included shopping, a theatre, bowling, gym, ice rink and other amenities.  The first 19 floors of each tower is for parking for almost 900 cars.  The 20th floor houses the laundry facilities.  Floors 21 to 60 house 450 apartment units, converted to condominiums in 1977.  Real estate listings in January 2013 included 2 bedroom units for $465,000 and larger one bedroom units for $300,000.

Shot handheld with a Nikon D3100 with a Nikkor 18-200mm lens at 125mm, f5, 1/125 sec., ISO 400.   Photo by John Ecker     |     pantheon photography

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Orange truck, Yellowknife Mining Museum, Yellowknife, NWT, photo by John Ecker | pantheon photography

ORANGE TRUCK, YELLOWKNIFE MINING MUSEUM:  For over 70 years, mining has been Yellowknife’s economic base. The industry provides over 50% of the Northwest Territory’s GDP.  The town was established in the mid 1930s, became the territorial capital in 1967 and finally incorporated in1970.  The Northwest Mining Heritage Society was formed in 2002 with plans to establish a mining museum and resource centre.  Currently, much of its collection is found outside, at the Giant Mine Town Site, located 4 km north of Yellowknife on the Ingraham Trail.  While the site appears just to be a hodgepodge of old relics, I was fascinated by the collection and what it represents.  The area has been a rich source of gold, radium and now diamonds. The society is assembling a huge trove of artefacts to share the rich history of mining in the area.

More information: Northwest Mining Heritage Society

Shot handheld with a Nikon D3100 with a Nikkor 18-200mm lens at 18mm, f6.3, 1/125 sec., ISO 1600.   Photo by John Ecker     |     pantheon photography


Fallen, Chicago, U.S.A., photo by John Ecker | pantheon photography

FALLEN, CHICAGO, U.S.A.:  Chicago is among my most favourite American cities.  Architecturally, it is one of the most interesting and diverse anywhere.  The restaurant scene is fantastic.  Public spaces and parks abound.  And, like any major metropolitan city, there is also a significant homeless population.   Click here for more information about Chicago’s Homeless statistics.

Shot handheld with a Nikon D3100, Nikkor 18-200mm lens at 65mm, f5, 1/160 sec., ISO 500.  Photo by John Ecker     |     pantheon photography


Ragged Ass Road, Yellowknife, NWT, photo by John Ecker | pantheon photography

RAGGED ASS ROAD:  Yes, in Yellowknife, Northwest Territories there is a street by that name. I was there not long ago, enjoying my time in ‘Old Town’ the original town site.  Ragged Ass Road is the official Yellowknife name for the short dirt road in this working-class neighbourhood.  Apparently, the street got its name after Lou Rocher and his buddies were drinking one night at the end of a long prospecting season with little profit to show for it.  ‘Ragged Ass’ meant dirt poor and they decided that night they should call their street ‘Ragged Ass Road’.  They made a sign, the name stuck and eventually the city adopted the name officially.  This 1949 Ford sits in the driveway of one of the homes on Ragged Ass Road.

Photo illustration by John Ecker     |     pantheon photography


1948 International Truck, Yellowknife, NWT, Canada, photo by John Ecker | pantheon photography

1948 INTERNATIONAL TRUCK, YELLOWKNIFE, NWT, CANADA: The Northwest Mining Heritage Society was formed in 2002 with plans to establish a mining museum and resource centre.  Currently, much of its collection is found outside, at the Giant Mine Town Site, located 4 km north of Yellowknife on the Ingraham Trail.  While the site appears just to be a hodgepodge of old relics, I was fascinated by the collection and what it represents.  The area has been a rich source of gold, radium and now diamonds. The society is assembling a huge trove of artefacts to share the rich history of mining in the area.  For over 70 years, mining has been the economic base; the industry provides over 50% of the NWT’s GDP.  The town was established in the mid 1930s, became the territorial capital in 1967 and finally incorporated in1970.  However, the area has long been the home of the Dene First Nation.   Yellowknife is named after the Yellowknives Dene First Nation, so-named for the copper tools they traded, made from copper deposits near the Arctic coast.

More information: Northwest Mining Heritage Society

Photo illustration by John Ecker, pantheon photography


Bressanone (Brixen) Cathedral, Italy, photo by John Ecker | pantheon photography

BRESSANONE CATHEDRAL, ITALY: Bressanone is also known as Brixen, its name when the town was part of Austria. It was annexed by Italy following the First World War. The Cathedral is a major feature in the town, located on a large public square. It was first built in the 10th century and rebuilt in the 13th. The current Baroque structure dates from 1745. Walking through the town, it feels more like Austria than Italy. Most people speak German and the restaurants tend to feature German fare. This photo was taken at dusk, before a huge storm that brought hail and heavy rains.

Shot using a tripod with a Nikon D3100; Nikkor 10-24mm lens at 10 mm; f7.1, 1/2 1600 ISO. Photo by John Ecker, Pantheon Photography.


Near Parliament Square, London, England

NEAR PARLIAMENT SQUARE, LONDON, ENGLAND:  Prince William and Kate Middleton will pass this spot on their wedding day.   Their whole route is designed to ensure they pass mostly by publicly-owned buildings, for security reasons.   Ms Middleton will travel by car, along The Mall, Horse Guards Parade, Whitehall and Parliament Square.  The service takes place at Westminster Abbey and will be conducted by The Dean of Westminster, the Very Rev Dr. John Hall but it’s the Archbishop of Canterbury, Dr. Rowan Williams, who will marry the couple. The Bishop of London, the Rt. Rev. Richard Chartres, will then give an address. Following the wedding, the married couple will travel in a carriage procession to Buckingham Palace, crossing Parliament Square before going along Whitehall, Horse Guards Parade and The Mall.  Shot handheld with a Nikon D70S, 18-55 AFS lens at 18mm, f22, 1/160th sec. 

Photo by John Ecker    |     pantheon photography


Chagall Windows, Reims Cathedral, France, photo by John Ecker, Pantheon Photography

CHAGALL WINDOWS, REIMS CATHEDRAL, FRANCE:    The Cathedral of Notre Dame at Reims is an excellent Gothic cathedral that is uncomplicated and straightforward in its layout and execution.  Like other French cathedrals, Reims was not spared in the First or Second World Wars.  It caught fire in 1918 during a bombardment and lead from the roof oozed through the mouths of the gargoyle rain spouts.  Five chapels are tightly placed around the ambulatory and are fairly shallow.  The ‘axial’ chapel is slightly deeper and it is here where the beautiful Marc Chagall windows dazzle visitors.  Shot handheld with a Nikon D300, Nikkor AF-S 16-85 lens at 16mm, 1/6 second, f3.5, ISO 800.  Photo by John Ecker


Basilica of St. John Lateran, Rome, Italy, photo by John Ecker, Pantheon Photography

BASILICA OF ST. JOHN LATERAN:  December 27th is the feast day of St. John the Evangelist.  This church is dedicated to St. John the Evangelist and John the Baptist.  It is one of the four major basilicas in Rome.  And, while most may think that St. Peter’s Basilica in Vatican City is the “Pope’s Church”, the Basilica of St. John Lateran is actually the Pope’s ‘home’ cathedral.  Built by the Emperor Constantine the Great in the 4th century, San Giovanni in Laterano was the first church to be officially built in Rome.  The cathedral was dedicated on November 9, 318. It was embellished with decorations given by Constantine, including seven silver altars with seven gilded candlesticks inlaid with images of the prophets.  The building has undergone many changes over the centuries following periods of neglect, invasion (Vandals) and natural disasters.  Arches are adorned with reliefs of angels, including those shown in this photo.  No two angels look alike.  Shot handheld with a Nikon D70s, Nikkor 18-55mm lens at 51 mm, f4.2 1/13 sec.

Photo by John Ecker    |    pantheon photography


Mont St. Michel, Normandy, France,photo by John Ecker, Pantheon Photography

MONT ST. MICHEL, FRANCE:  This small rocky island on the coast of Normandy is home to a medieval Benedictine Abbey.  Legend has it that the archangel Michael appeared before St. Aubert, Bishop of Avranches, in 708.  The archangel told the Bishop to build a church on the site.  The Bishop ignored the call, until Michael burned a hole in the Bishop’s skull with his finger.  Construction began soon after!  The site was dedicated to Michael on October 16, 708.   Mont St. Michel has primarily served as a Benedictine Abbey, but during the French revolution it was converted to a prison.  Victor Hugo was a vocal proponent of Mont St. Michel and helped to have the prison closed in 1863.  The following year it was declared an historic monument.  Over a century later, in 1979, it was named a UNESCO World Heritage Site.  This has to be one of the most photographed sites in the world. Finding a unique perspective is hard to do.  This photo was captured travelling the hard to find paths and small country roads.  Shot handheld with a Nikon D40X, Nikkor  AF-S 70 – 300mm lens at 225mm, 1/500 sec., f16, 800 ISO.  P

hoto by John Ecker     |     pantheon photography