| images by john ecker, pantheon photography

Posts tagged “blue

Sunflower, Arsie, Veneto Region, Italy: photo by John Ecker | pantheon photography

Dolomite Mountains Sunflower photo by John Ecker, pantheon photography

SUNFLOWER, ARSIE, VENETO REGION, ITALY: This beautiful sunflower stood out against a blue sky in the Dolomite Mountains of northern Italy. I like the shot because of the way the leaves create a feeling of motion.  It was also one of my big sister’s favourite flowers. The photo was taken in the town of Arsie, which is located roughly 80 kms. northwest of Venice in the Veneto Region. Arsie sits on a plain surrounded by mountains near Lake Corlo, an artificial lake created in 1954 along the slopes of Monte Grappa for the production of hydro electricity. At its height in 1911, approximately 11,000 people lived in Arsie. Now, there are roughly 2,500 people living in the town. 6 Catholic parishes, 5 schools and 2 banks and 1 pharmacy serve the town.
Shot handheld with a Nikon D300, 18-200 DX zoom lens at 82mm, f25, 1/250 sec, ISO 1250
Copyright photo by John Ecker | pantheon photography

 


On the Highway to Alaska from the Yukon, photo by John Ecker | pantheon photography

ON THE HIGHWAY TO ALASKA FROM THE YUKON:  It is a beautiful drive from Carcross, Yukon to Skagway, Alaska. Originally, the route was called the Carcross Road and then became part of the Alaska Highway during the Second World War.  That highway was developed at a frantic pace in wartime.   It has also served the mining industry well, but today is largely used for tourist traffic during the busy summer months.  Stop anywhere along the road and you are sure to take in a breathtaking vista.

Shot handheld with a Nikon D300 with a Nikkor 10-24mm lens at 12mm, f11 1/500 sec., ISO 500.   Photo by John Ecker     |     pantheon photography


Tuscany, Italy, photo by John Ecker | pantheon photography

TUSCANY ITALY:   Tuscany and Tuscan inspired decor and colours became especially popular after the release of Frances Mayes’ book Under the Tuscan Sun in 1997 and released as a major motion picture in 2003. It seems every home paint manufacturer soon came out Tuscan inspired colours– typically in the red/ocher, orange, yellow/gold, green and– to a lesser extent, blue hues.  I find the ocher colour of this farm building to be pretty typical of the Tuscan countryside.  The Tuscan region is also where the Italian Renaissance was born– home to Michelangelo, da Vinci, Botticellie and Puccini.  And, of course, it’s the also home of Chianti!

Shot handheld with a Nikon D3100, AF-S 10-24mm lens at 11mm, f14, 1/2000 sec. ISO 1600

Photo by John Ecker     |     pantheon photography


Blue Chairs, Green Grass, Soybean Field, photo by John Ecker | pantheon photography

BLUE CHAIRS, GREEN GRASS, SOYBEAN FIELD:  This shot was taken in southern Ontario on the northern boundary of Durham Region.  The field crop behind the chairs is soybeans– a large cash crop in the Province of Ontario where approximately 2 million acres are planted annually. The crop is increasingly grown elsewhere in Canada and enjoys a good export market.  For exported beans, the biggest buyer (2006 data) is Japan, followed by Malaysia, the Netherlands and Iran. The beans have many uses.  They are grown for specialty foods, oil production and livestock feed.  Ever eat those artificial bacon bits?  Yummy?  Chances are they were made from soybeans.  They have industrial uses as well.  Henry Ford, founder of the Ford Motor Company, was an advocate for the use of soy for plastics, paints and fibres.  Printing inks are often made from soy and it’s even used as an eco-friendly lubricant and in candles and crayons.  Soybeans are also good in biodiesel.  Makes me want to sit in one of those blue chairs and dream up another use for this magic bean!

Shot handheld with a Nikon D300, AFS 70-300 DX lens at 155mm, 1/320 sec, f18, ISO 1000

Photo by John Ecker     |     pantheon photography


Marechal Foch Tomb, Paris, France, photo by John Ecker, Pantheon Photography

FERDINAND FOCH TOMB, PARIS, FRANCE: This is the tomb for Ferdinand Foch.  He died on March 20, 1929, and was interred
in Les Invalides,  in Paris, near the tomb of Napoleon.  Foch is considered to be one of France’s greatest military minds.  (He must have been smart; they even named a variety of wine grape after him!)   Foch rose quickly through the ranks during World War I and was appointed Supreme Commander of the Allied Armies on March 26, 1918 with the title of ‘Generalissime’ (supreme General).   Foch believed that the Treaty of Versailles a “treason” because only the permanent occupation of the Rhineland would prevent future German aggression. As the treaty was being signed Foch reportedly said: “This is not peace. It is an armistice for 20 years.” His words were prophetic.  World War II started just twenty years and sixty five days later.  The tomb is located one level above that of Napoleon.

Shot handheld with a Nikon D40X, with a Nikkor 70-300mm lens at 127mm, f5.3, 1/15th sec., ISO 800.  Image by John Ecker   |    pantheon photography


Chagall Windows, Reims Cathedral, France, photo by John Ecker, Pantheon Photography

CHAGALL WINDOWS, REIMS CATHEDRAL, FRANCE:    The Cathedral of Notre Dame at Reims is an excellent Gothic cathedral that is uncomplicated and straightforward in its layout and execution.  Like other French cathedrals, Reims was not spared in the First or Second World Wars.  It caught fire in 1918 during a bombardment and lead from the roof oozed through the mouths of the gargoyle rain spouts.  Five chapels are tightly placed around the ambulatory and are fairly shallow.  The ‘axial’ chapel is slightly deeper and it is here where the beautiful Marc Chagall windows dazzle visitors.  Shot handheld with a Nikon D300, Nikkor AF-S 16-85 lens at 16mm, 1/6 second, f3.5, ISO 800.  Photo by John Ecker


Gateway Arch and Water Fountain, St. Louis, Mphoto by John Ecker, Pantheon Photographyissouri,

GATEWAY ARCH, AND WATER FOUNTAIN, ST. LOUIS MISSOURI:  Here’s another shot of the Gateway Arch in St. Louis.  (See my Gateway Arch and Fire Hydrant shot here.)   Those tiny windows at the top are on the observation deck.  For a fee, visitors can take a tramway from either end of the base and travel to the top in egg-shaped compartments.  The Arch was opened to the public in 1967.  It was designed by architect Eero Saarinen and structural engineer Hannskarl Bandel.  I loved the symmetry between the shape of the arch and the arc of the water from the fountain.   Fun fact: The Arch is a structure known as a catenary curve, the shape a free-hanging chain takes when held at both ends, and considered the most structurally-sound arch shape.  Shot handheld with a Nikon D40X, Nikkor AF-S 18-200 lens at 63mm, f18, 1/160 sec. ISO 400.  Photo by John Ecker     |     pantheon photography


Gateway Arch and Fire Hydrant, St. Louis, Missouri, photo by John Ecker, Pantheon Photography

GATEWAY ARCH, AND FIRE HYDRANT, ST. LOUIS MISSOURI:   I usually do lots of research about the places I plan to visit before I travel.  Before my whirlwind trip through the mid-west with my son to see some baseball (Cardinals, Royals, then the Reds)  I knew little about the Gateway Arch.  What an amazing and beautiful landmark. No wonder it’s a National Monument.  It is clad with 900 tons of stainless steel and presents an ever-changing image as the light reflects off its surface, depending on the time of day.  We were lucky to be there on a cloudless day with nothing but blue skies.  Standing 630 feet tall, it’s the tallest man-made monument in America.    It can be seen from pretty well anywhere in the city, affording endless opportunities for photographers.    Shot handheld with a Nikon D40X, Nikkor AF-S 18-200 lens at 27mm, f18, 1/250 sec. ISO 400. 

Photo by John Ecker    |    pantheon photography


Pacific Coast, California, photo by John Ecker, Pantheon Photography

PACIFIC COAST, CALIFORNIA:   The drive up the California coast from San Francisco is one of the most exhilarating journeys you can take in a car.  The highway twists and turns.  It barely hugs the cliffs, giving the sensation of almost soaring above the rugged coast.  As a photographer, the temptation is always strong to stop and take a shot. But on this highway, doing so can be fatal.  With twists, turns and switchbacks, there are few straightaways with views down the road.  The shoulders are narrow and often rock-strewn.  This photo was taken at one of the coastal lookouts.  Shot handheld with a Nikon D300, Nikkor AF-S 16-85 mm lens at 60 mm, f25, 1/1/250 sec, ISO 800.  Photo by John Ecker     |     pantheon photography


Boats, Capri, Italy, photo by John Ecker, Pantheon Photography

BOATS, CAPRI, ITALY:  Capri is a small island south of Rome in the Tyrrhenian Sea.  It’s a short ferry trip from Naples and easily one of the most picturesque places in all of Italy.  It’s just over 4 square miles but its highest elevation is almost 2,000 feet above sea level.  The trip to the peak via the single seat cable system is sublime.  From the top, the views are magnificent. These boats are found on beaches all around the island.  Shot handheld, Nikon S700, 90mm, f.4.8, 1/70 sec., ISO 64. 

Photo by John Ecker     |     pantheon photography