| images by john ecker, pantheon photography

Posts tagged “poppy

Remembrance Day, 2011, photo by John Ecker | pantheon photography

Each year, at the 11th hour on the 11th day of the 11th month, we pause to remember those Canadians who died in service to their  country.  We’ll wear poppies or forget-me-nots.   We’ll think about loved ones lost or maybe relatives we never met because they made the supreme sacrifice.

Over these past almost 100 years since wearing a poppy started as a Canadian tradition, approximately 115,000 Canadians have died in war and military service:  First World War, 66,665; Second World War, 46,998; Korea, 516; Peacekeeping, 121; Afghanistan, 154. As a percentage of population, in the First World War, almost 1% (.92%) of Canada’s population was lost to war.  In the United States it was .13% and the United Kingdom 2.19%.  In the Second World War, .40% of Canada’s population was lost to war.  In the United States, .32% and the United Kingdom .94%.

Shot handheld with a Nikon D40x, Nikon AFS 70-300 lens at 300mm, f10, 1/250 sec. ISO 1600. Photo by John Ecker    |      pantheon photography

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Remembrance: Vimy Canadian Cemetery, France, photo by John Ecker | pantheon photography

REMEMBRANCE: VIMY CANADIAN CEMETERY, FRANCE:  Shot handheld with a Nikon D300, Nikkor 18-200 lens at 127mm, f22, 1/125 sec. ISO 1000.  Photo by John Ecker    |     pantheon photography


Poppies Against a Blue Sky, Northern France, photo by John Ecker, Pantheon Photography

POPPIES AGAINST A BLUE SKY, NORTHERN FRANCE: Poppies are widely recognized as a flower of remembrance.  The poppy become a strong emblem remembrance due in large part to the famous poem, In Flanders Fields written by Canadian Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae who wrote the poem on May 3, 1915.  As a Canadian traveler in northern France, it is impossible not to notice the ubiquitous flower.   Most Commonwealth countries observe one or two minutes of silence each year on November 11th at 11:00 a.m. (eleventh day of the eleventh month at the eleventh hour).

Photo illustration by John Ecker     |     Pantheon Photography


Poppy in Wheat field, Northern France

POPPY IN WHEAT FIELD, NORTHERN FRANCE:  Spring will soon be here and the poppies will emerge in Northern France.  The poppy is, of course, a flower of remembrance.  Canadian Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae wrote his famous poem “In Flanders Fields” around May 3, 1915, lamenting the loss of a close friend in battle.  Pretty well every school child in Canada knows the poem and it’s publicly recited year after year on November 11th.   Poppies can be seen all along country roads in France and Belgium.  This one was growing in a wheat field. 

Shot handheld with a Nikon D40X, Nikkor AF-S 18-200 zoom lens at 145mm., f13, 1/640 sec, ISO 800. 

Photo by John Ecker     |     Pantheon


Flower Field, Northern France, photo by John Ecker, Pantheon Photography

FLOWER FIELD, NORTHERN FRANCE:   Poppies dot the landscape of northern France.   Their  bright red colour and symbolism as the flower of remembrance can make them a compelling feature in photographs.  As I composed this shot, I recalled something one of  my photography professors shared years ago when I was in college.  He believed that any photo that included a person became a photo of a person.  His point was that the mere presence of a person in a photo established both its context and focal point.  Applying my old prof’s maxim to this shot, the scarecrow is a person in effigy,  thereby strongly drawing the viewer’s attention to it.   What do you think– does the inclusion of a person in a photo establish a strong focal point?    Shot handheld with a Nikon, D300, Nikkor 70 – 300 mm at 127 mm, 1/400 sec, f29, ISO 200.

Photo by John Ecker    |    pantheon photography


Remembrance Day, November 11, 2010, photo by John Ecker, Pantheon Photography

REMEMBRANCE DAY, NOVEMBER 11, 2010:  It’s Remembrance Day.  The poppy is the enduring symbol that reminds us of those who gave their lives in battle.  Like so many Canadians, I cannot look at a poppy without thinking of the poem by John McCrae.  McCrae joined up in August 1914 and was appointed brigade surgeon with the First Brigade of the Canadian Field Artillery.   He served in Belgium and witnessed the bloody Second Battle of Ypres, in Flanders.  McCrae wrote his famous poem the day after the death of a close friend in battle.   McCrae died of pneumonia and meningitis on January 28, 1918. He was buried with full military honours in Wimereaux Cemetery.  His grave is simply marked, but always adorned with poppies and poppy wreaths.  Click here to read  In Flanders FieldsShot handheld with a Nikon D300, Nikkor 16-85 VR lens at 75mm, f32, 1/160 sec., ISO 800. 

Photo by John Ecker     |     pantheon photography


Remembrance: Vimy Canadian Cemetery, France,photo by John Ecker, Pantheon Photography

REMEMBRANCE: VIMY CANADIAN CEMETERY, FRANCE:  Shot handheld with a Nikon D300, Nikkor 18-200 lens at 127mm, f22, 1/125 sec. ISO 1000.  Photo by John Ecker    |     pantheon photography


Beaumont-Hamel, France, Battle of the Somme, 1916, photo by John Ecker, Pantheon Photography

BEAUMONT-HAMEL, FRANCE, BATTLE OF THE SOMME, 1916.  Click here for my story about Beaumont-HamelPhoto by John Ecker         pantheon photography